Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2018, Page: 80-90
Additive Manufacturing Technology Development: A Trajectory Towards Industrial Revolution
Onuh Ojogba Spencer, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Centre for Satellite Technology Development, Abuja, Nigeria; National Space Research and Development Agency (NASRDA), Abuja, Nigeria
Olatunbosun Tafa Yusuf, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Centre for Satellite Technology Development, Abuja, Nigeria; National Space Research and Development Agency (NASRDA), Abuja, Nigeria
Temidayo Christopher Tofade, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Centre for Satellite Technology Development, Abuja, Nigeria; National Space Research and Development Agency (NASRDA), Abuja, Nigeria
Received: Oct. 1, 2018;       Accepted: Oct. 25, 2018;       Published: Dec. 5, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajmie.20180305.12      View  16      Downloads  8
Abstract
With the recent advancement in complexity of various technological products and the need for faster production, the quest for inventing new manufacturing technologies to reduce the design limitations such as the costs involved in purchasing and maintaining machines, the need for a trained operator, and increase in waste produced during machining in conventional manufacturing methods, has received significant boost in recent time with the advent of additive technology (AM) or 3D printing within various experts in industry, research & development institutes and universities, which invariably has not only enhanced deliverable on time and on budget of products, as well as ability to fabricate complex geometry with high precision and weight reduction. Several types of additive manufacturing (AM) that use different technologies and materials have emerged, in which the 3D systems are used to produce objects through adding rather than subtracting materials, transforming essentially detailed design files to fully functional products, to directly or indirectly alleviate the burden associated with convectional manufacturing and assembly methods. In this paper, an extensive review has been done on several methods adopted in 3D printing. Example include: Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), Continuous Filament Fabrication (CFF), Stereolithography (SLA), Atomic Diffusion Additive Manufacturing (ADAM) and Selective Laser Melting (SLM). The various steps involve in operation and working principle of 3D printing technology was also stated. The paper also presents the applicable areas of 3-D printing focusing on tooling, aviation/aerospace, medical/biomechanical and city planning.
Keywords
Additive Manufacturing, Fused Filament Fabrication, Selective Laser Sintering, Continuous Filament Fabrication, Stereolithography, Atomic Diffusion and Selective Laser Melting
To cite this article
Onuh Ojogba Spencer, Olatunbosun Tafa Yusuf, Temidayo Christopher Tofade, Additive Manufacturing Technology Development: A Trajectory Towards Industrial Revolution, American Journal of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2018, pp. 80-90. doi: 10.11648/j.ajmie.20180305.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
ASTM Standard. Standard terminology for additive manufacturing technologies, vol. 10.04.
[2]
Kief H. B. and Roschiwal, “The Free Beginner’s Guide to 3D printing 3D printing industry.com”, 2011.
[3]
The Birth of 3D Printing – 3D Systems Corporation Building Parts, Layer By Layer – Objet Ltd.
[4]
www.esa.int. Accessed and retrieved July 2018.
[5]
Wohlers Report 2015: 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing State of the Industry Annual Worldwide Progress Report”, Wohlers Associates, 2015.
[6]
Simulating reality, MSC Software Magazine Volume VII-Summer 2017 Issue.
[7]
3D Printing: The Next Revolution in Industrial Manufacturing, New research from UPS and the Consumer Technology Association (CTA).
[8]
Sculpteo : “The state of 3d printing in their third edition,” 2017.
[9]
Wohlers TT, “Additive manufacturing and 3D printing state of the industry: annual worldwide progress report.” Fort Collins, Wohlers Associates, 2012.
[10]
Pham DT, Dimov SS, “Rapid manufacturing,” Springer Verlag, p 6, 2001.
[11]
https://www.sd3d.com/fff-vs-sla-vs-sls/. Accessed: July 2018.
[12]
https://www.swerea.se/sites/default/files/fff.pdf. Accessed and retrieved July 2018.
[13]
http://prototype.asia/3dprinting/Polyjet/ Accessed: June 2018.
[14]
http://blogs.solidworks.com/tech/2015/05/preparing-solidworks-models-3d-printing.html. Accessed: August 2018.
[15]
https://grabcad.com/tutorials/3d-printing-with-autocad-and-makerbot. Accessed: 2018.
[16]
https://imagetransforms.com/makerbot-replicator/. Accessed: August 2018.
[17]
https://all3dp.com/4/3d-hubs-releases-digital-manufacturing-trend-report-q4-2018/. Accessed: October 2018.
[18]
https://3dprint.com/66742/ultimaker-2-aluminum-extrusion/. Accessed: September 2018.
[19]
https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor#/media/File:Nema_17_Stepper_Motor.jp. Accessed: August 2018.
[20]
https://sourceforge.net/projects/easycnc/ Accessed: September 2018.
[21]
https://3duniverse.org/2018/08/03/ultimaker-s5-introduction/ Accessed: September 2018.
[22]
https://shop3duniverse.com/products/ultimaker-s5-education-bundle Accessed: September 2018.
[23]
Wohlers TT, “Wohlers report 2012: additive manufacturing and 3D printing state of the industry: annual worldwide progress report.” Fort Collins, Wohlers Associates, 2012.
[24]
https://www.ebay.com/itm/OEM-Kia-Sorento-Headlamp-Turn-Signal-and-Wiper-Steering-Column-Switch-/142376755598 Accessed and retrieved July 2018.
[25]
Stratasys: Winn Hardin, “Additive Manufacturing Boosts Aerospace Applications,” 2016.
[26]
http://www.makepartsfast.com/ Accessed: July 2018.
[27]
www.cgarchitect.com. Accessed: July 2018.
Browse journals by subject